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This exhibition highlights one venue within the Waldorf-Astoria. The Empire Room, located on the left of the Park Avenue Foyer upon entering from the street, holds a history that contains not only shifts in location within the hotel, but in society during and following Prohibition, the Great Depression and World War II. In its form as a dazzling supper club, the Empire Room hosted the highest level of entertainers from Frank Sinatra to Ella Fitzgerald, Sonny and Cher and many many more. READ MORE...





This exhibition came about by the discovery of dozens of autographed photographs and portraits given to Oscar. It seems that Oscar brought these with him when he moved into the hotel in 1939 after the death of his beloved Mrs. Tschirky. In his biography, of the portraits he said “with them about me I feel more or less at home”. While showing the affection that these people had for our host, this exhibition also gives a glimpse into the social whirl of the Waldorf-Astoria in the early 1900s. These portraits are of notable men in industry, finance, philanthropy, politics and more, who, whether based in New York City or overseas, clearly felt they had a home at the Waldorf-Astoria. That is in no small part due to Oscar’s friendly and welcoming nature. READ MORE...





In the summer of 2012, the Waldorf Astoria went to the public with an unusual request: to return any surreptitious "amenities" that checked out with guests. The response was overwhelming, with former guests - and their descendants - returning objects from around the globe. In addition to silverware and services, their stories have become parts of the Waldorf Astoria's tapestry. READ MORE...





Before the twin Art Deco skyscrapers and Conrad Hilton, there were American's wealthiest man, a family feud, and an ambitious hotelier. On March 14, 1893, a society ball inaugurated over a century of hospitality and luxury. For the next thirty-five years, 34th and Fifth was host to a wonder of the modern world, where the extraordinary was commonplace and the world was changed daily. READ MORE...





The Hilton Hotels mission of filling the earth with the light of our hospitality has, on occasion, been applied literally. On November 9, 1965, The Waldorf=Astoria Hotel was preparing for the closing banquet of the 21st National Commercial Finance Conference when the power went out. This citywide electric outage was no match for The Waldorf spirit, however – the regular menu was served by candlelight, musicians still played in the Grand Ballroom, and featured speakers spoke. READ MORE...




Washington D.C. may be our nation’s capital, but George Washington took the presidential oath of office in Manhattan. Since then, while Washington D.C. has served as United States headquarters, New York City has remained the cultural and political heart of the world – and The Waldorf=Astoria Hotel is at the center of this heart. Since The Waldorf=Astoria reopened on Park Avenue, the Presidential Suite on the 35th floor has hosted every United States President since Herbert Hoover. READ MORE...




Conrad Hilton’s birthday is a national holiday. Born December 25, 1887 in San Antonio (24 years before New Mexico joined the Union), Mr. Hilton’s first home – a simple ten-room adobe structure – became the first Hilton Hotel. Reportedly at Conrad’s suggestion, Hilton’s father began renting out bedrooms as his children moved out into the world – Conrad Hilton’s first hotel job involved meeting middle-of-the-night trains and bringing guests back to Hilton lodging. READ MORE...




The 1931 reopening of the Waldorf=Astoria Hotel on Park Avenue was cause for celebration and called for a toast – with nonalcoholic cider. Oscar Tschirky of the Waldorf described June 30, 1919 (the day National Prohibition went into effect) as the saddest day in his career. While the repeal of Prohibition in 1933 might not have been the happiest period in Oscar’s unparalleled half-century of service to the Waldorf, the Astoria, and both Waldorf=Astorias, it still looks like he had a good time. READ MORE...